My Top 3 Leader Resolutions for 2013


Like many people, I use the entry into a new year as a time to assess what I am grateful about and to make proclamations about what I’d like to do differently this year. Here are my top three leader resolutions for 2013.

  1. Be vigilant in the pursuit of talent. Our workforce and our clients are increasingly diverse and while talent can come from anywhere, the opportunities to build and showcase it are not evenly distributed. I intend to take the autopilot off leadership concepts I hold and pay attention to the stereotypes I have about what leadership looks like and how leadership happens. In 2013, I plan to look for talent in every person and situation. Recognize it, built it, and hold onto it whenever and wherever possible. That includes building my own talent by learning a new skill this year – speaking French.
  2. Be flexible. A shift to a more knowledge-based and global economy and the advance of mobile technologies has changed how we work. Many of us can work from anywhere and at any time. Working more doesn’t always lead to achieving more; in fact it can lead to inefficiency and ineffectiveness. In 2013, I plan to pay better attention to what I need to do to be more effective and have greater wellbeing. Exercise is on the agenda to help me increase energy and improve my health, but I also plan to be more open and flexible with myself (and others) in terms how I get work done. Luckily, part of my research includes examining different strategies for managing work-life boundaries, so I have a wealth of information to draw from.
  3. Be mindful. A recent article in the Journal of Applied Psychology focuses on the benefits of mindfulness at work. Being mindful is basically paying attention (being in the moment) and being open to things in a non-judgmental way. It is a practice that has been shown to have benefits in a lot of areas, but work isn’t usually at the top of one’s list. I admit, I struggle with this – but if I can manage to get into and stay in a state of mindfulness I tend to do better work and have more energy to do it. So, getting familiar with strategies that can help me be more mindful are on the agenda for 2013.

What’s on your list of resolutions?

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About Kelly Hannum

Kelly is the Director of the Global Research Insights group at the Center for Creative Leadership® and a visiting faculty member at the IESEG School of Management in France. Since joining CCL® in 1993 she has managed a variety of research, evaluation, and assessment related projects. Kelly received her Ph.D. in Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro . She is also the recipient of the Marcia Guttentag Award from the American Evaluation Association and Young Alumni Awards from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Guilford College.
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3 Responses to My Top 3 Leader Resolutions for 2013

  1. Pingback: Top 3 Leader Resolutions for 2013 | Rod Schulhauser

  2. avatar David Sparks says:

    Resolutions:
    To absorb & apply the information I’ve been consuming.

    To slow down and reflect with thinking time.

  3. avatar Jackie S. says:

    Hi Kelly,
    It is nice to see a resolution list that isn’t consumed with superficial goals like weight loss, getting a boyfriend, yada yada yada. I think it’s important as a business owner, and as a leader to set goals for yourself as often as possible to help encourage yourself to change and grow with your staff (and hopefully grow with your business!). The management book that helped me to find my resolution for this business year is by author Bill Sims Jr. called “Green Beans & Ice Cream,” (http://greenbeanleadership.com/). A book that embraces and teaches the CORRECT way to use positive reinforcement in the workplace and at home. The book is a fast paced read that delivers research and real life examples (I really feel like it reads like a conversation). What I like about it is that it’s well written and short enough that if you give it to someone, chances are that they are actually going to read it– and they are going to understand it. There are not many management books like that out there… Direct positive reinforcement with your staff helps to boost morale in the workplace and makes them feel like they’re apart of something meaningful, not just another boring job. Besides showing how/why positive reinforcement is so good, this book also devotes time to discussing other methods of motivation that are not very effective. Motivational means such as employee of the month recognition, employee pizza parties, taking employees out for lunch, etc., are not as effective as they first seem. The problem with many of these traditional motivators is that they either broaden the reward too much and include people who do not deserve it or they unintentionally pit employees against each other and foster resentment. I highly recommend this to anyone looking for something new to try (I hope you will add this to your leader resolutions for this year or perhaps the next!!)

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